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Poor or rich?

Simple question from the first sight.
U.S. Census Bureau defines poverty as a certain income level, which is $1062 a month for a single in US.
However, the life is not such easy. All people are different and have non-identical needs.
House rent, mortgage are not the same everywhere. Deceases, allergy any other special needs - all these raise the expenses.
Another definition of poverty is inability to keep expenses under incomes. And such way is hard to define: under certain circumstances even $1M of income is still poverty.
Furthermore, many people do not see themselves in poverty: the feeling of high incomes keeps them blind towards expenses until it is too late.
We take new financial liabilities, debts, burden. Buying a new house or getting a baby - all this raise expenses and we feel wrong only when our savings fall to zero.



Financial threshold
The threshold, point where the lines of incomes and expenses cross, is often not noticeable for the majority. But even this is too late to start acting.

The wise keep the two curves as far from each other as possible.  And act as soon as the "incomes" turns down or "expenses" jumps up.

Having a proper tool is essential, but not sufficient. The tool needs data.
However, the smartest tools can predict data and build the forecasts without much manual input.


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