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Transaction Dilemma: single or multi?

Sometimes we come to a supermarket to purchase more than one thing. In certain cases we might  buy items that belong to different categories.
We pay at POS with a credit card, and get a single record in the bank log. Say, $84.23 spent in Auchan.

Here the dilemma comes. How to make the record in your accounting tool?
Make a record per category? Like this:
    • $21.12 for foodstuff
    • $35.15 for closing
    • $27.96 for electronic devices
But you would loose the bank-transaction value of $84.23. And, if in the future you need to search for the value (checking whether all transaction have been recorded into your accounting tool), you won't find this "$84.23". It simply wouldn't exist in the expenses records.



Another option is to make a single transaction of $84.23. But what expense should it be? Food? Electronics?
Ideally would be to keep the initial value of $84.23, and have the split expenses. Something link this:

   
Then you can find your transaction by its bank-value, and your financial stats stay consistent.

This is called "Elastic Transactions" in The Finance Planner.
Once subscribed, please contact us to get a free trial of Pro features, among which you will find the Elastic Transactions as well.

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